• 17 June 2021

    Waiving the waiting period for EI beneficiaries who establish a new claim between January 31, 2021, and September 25, 2021. This includes claims for regular, fishing, and special benefits and will allow people who apply during that period and return to work before exhausting all their weeks of entitlement to benefit from an additional week of income support. The maximum number of weeks of benefits will not change.

  • 17 June 2021

    Maintaining uniform access to EI regular and special benefits across all regions, through a 420-hour entrance requirement, with a 14-week minimum entitlement for regular benefits, and a new common earnings threshold for fishing benefits. This measure is assumed to come into force on September 26, 2021 and last for one year.

  • 10 June 2021

    Modifying federal student financial assistance, including support under the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP).

  • 3 June 2021

    Broadening access to the CWB by increasing the phase-in rates and thresholds, as well as providing greater financial incentive for working couples. 

  • 27 May 2021

    Provide eligible employers with a subsidy of up to 50 per cent on the incremental remuneration paid to eligible employees between June 6, 2021 and November 20, 2021.  Employers must choose between the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) or the Canada Recovery Hiring Program (CRHP).

  • 27 May 2021

    In Budget 2021 the Government of Canada proposed to increase the maximum number of weeks for which employment insurance sickness benefits may be paid due to a prescribed illness, injury, or quarantine to 26 weeks from 15 weeks. The extension is planned to come into effect summer 2022.

  • 27 May 2021

    Implementation of a new corporate income tax for companies offering digital services. The tax will take effect January 1, 2022. This measure is temporary and will only apply in the event that Canada does not reach a multilateral agreement on the taxation of digital services.

    It will be a 3% tax on revenues collected by online marketplaces, social media, online advertising services, and user data sales and licensing services. This tax will apply to businesses with worldwide revenues of at least €750 million and Canadian revenues of more than $20 million.

  • 26 May 2021

    Introducing financial support for oil and gas companies to reduce methane emissions.

    The Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF) – Onshore will offer up to $675 million in contributions to support capital projects that lower or eliminate routine venting of methane oil and gas operations.  The overall ERF includes a further $75 million for offshore oil and gas operations, which is outside the scope of the analysis.

  • 26 May 2021

    Bill C-265 proposes to increase the maximum number of weeks for which employment insurance sickness benefits may be paid due to a prescribed illness, injury, or quarantine to 50 weeks from 15 weeks. The extension is planned to come into effect summer 2022.

  • 20 May 2021

    The corporate income tax (CIT) rate on eligible zero-emission technology manufacturing and processing activities will be reduced in half. This will reduce the CIT rate on small businesses from 9 to 4.5 per cent and the general CIT rate from 15 to 7.5 per cent. The rate reduction will apply to taxation years that begin after 2021 and before 2031 (gradually phasing out between 2029 and 2031).

  • 20 May 2021

    The introduction of a sales tax applied at the point of purchase of automobiles and aircraft valued over $100,000 and vessels valued over $250,000. The tax will only apply to new vehicles purchased for personal use. The tax rate will be the lesser of 10 per cent of the full value of the vehicle, or 20 per cent of the value above the threshold. 

    This tax will come into effect on January 1, 2022.

  • 13 May 2021

    Certain foreign-based sellers store goods in warehouses within Canada in anticipation of the goods being sold to buyers located in Canada. Once an item is purchased, it is shipped from the warehouse to the buyer.

  • 13 May 2021

    In Budget 2021 the government of Canada proposed to introduce a national 1% tax on the value of non-resident, non-Canadian owned residential real estate considered to be vacant or underused. The tax is planned to take effect on January 2022 and will require all owners of residential property in Canada, other than Canadian citizens or permanent residents to file a declaration for the prior calendar year in respect of each Canadian residential property they own. Depending on circumstances, owners may be eligible to exemptions from the tax in respect of a property for the year. An exemption may be available, for instance, where a property is leased to one or more qualified tenants in relation to the owner for a minimum period in a calendar year.

  • 5 May 2021

    Increasing the tobacco excise duty rate by $4 per carton of 200 cigarettes, along with corresponding increases to the excise duty rates for other tobacco products.

  • 31 March 2021

    The number of EI regular weeks of benefits will be increased to a maximum of 50 weeks for claims made between September 27, 2020 and September 25, 2021.

  • 18 March 2021

    On February 19, 2021, the government announced the extension of the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit (CRSB).  The extension will allow workers to take an additional two weeks of benefits, bringing the total maximum benefit to four weeks.

    The CRSB provides $500 per week to those who are absent from at least 50% of their typical time at work in a given week because of being ill from COVID-19, self-isolating due to COVID-19, or having a medical condition that would cause them to be more vulnerable to contracting COVID-19.

    This benefit is taxable. The CRSB program is in effect from September 27, 2020 to September 25, 2021.

  • 18 March 2021

    On February 19, the Government announced it was extending the eligibility of the Canada Recovery Caregiver Benefit (CRCB) by an additional 12 weeks, bringing the maximum benefit period to 38 weeks.

    The CRCB provides a $500 weekly taxable benefit per household for workers who miss at least 50% of their normal time at work during a week to care for someone for reasons related to COVID-19.  

    Reasons that a worker could claim the CRCB include caring for a child under 12 or another family member 12 or over who cannot be left alone without supervision; whose school, childcare, or other type of care program is closed due to COVID-19; whose normal caregiver cannot provide care due to COVID-19; or who is staying home because they have an increased risk of severe health consequences if they become infected with COVID-19.

    Eligible workers must have earned at least $5,000 in any of 2019, 2020, or the span of 12 months before they apply for the CRCB.  They are ineligible for the CRCB if they are receiving certain other benefits (for example, the Canada Recovery Benefit, the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit, Employment Insurance). This program sunsets on September 25, 2021.

    Eligible workers must have earned at least $5,000 in any of 2019, 2020, or the span of 12 months before they apply for the CRCB.  They are ineligible for the CRCB if they are receiving certain other benefits (for example, the Canada Recovery Benefit, the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit, Employment Insurance ). This program sunsets on September 25, 2021.

  • 18 March 2021

    The CRB, introduced on September 27, 2020, provides $500 per week to workers who do not qualify for EI, who earned at least $5,000 in 2019 or 2020 and who are unable to return to work or had their income reduced by at least 50% due to COVID-19. The program will last for one year.

    Claimants will need to repay $0.50 of the benefit for each dollar of their annual income above $38,000 in the calendar year, up to a maximum of the amount of benefit they received. The $38,000 threshold will not include amounts received under the benefit. The benefit will be taxable.

    In February, the program was amended to increase the maximum number of weeks for which the CRB can be claimed from 26 to 38 weeks.

  • 11 March 2021

    This private member’s bill would amend the Income Tax Act and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act so that students enrolled in a designated educational institution with a Disability Tax Credit (DTC) certificate will receive a grant equal to their annual tuition fees. It is assumed that the bill will come into effect on August 2021, the start of the 2021-22 loan year.

  • 18 February 2021

    Certain foreign-based sellers store goods in warehouses within Canada in anticipation of the goods being sold to buyers located in Canada. Once an item is purchased, it is shipped from the warehouse to the buyer. While GST is paid on the wholesale value of the good when it is imported into Canada, GST is not necessarily collected on the gap between the wholesale value and the final price of the good. The proposed measure would ensure that GST is collected on this price gap.

    If a seller is registered to collect GST, the seller themselves would be responsible for collecting GST on the final price. If a seller is not registered but they sell through a distribution platform, the platform would be responsible for collecting GST on the final price on behalf of the seller.

    This policy would come into effect on July 1, 2021.