Bill C-266: Increasing the duration of parole ineligibility

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Bill C-266: Increasing the duration of parole ineligibility.pdf

Summary
Under Bill C-266, judges will have the discretion to increase the period of parole ineligibly for affected offenders from 25 years to up to 40 years. Because Bill C-266 affects sentencing, it will not affect offenders who are already convicted and have been sentenced. As a result, it will not give rise to any costs for at least 26 years, (that is, until year 2044, assuming it comes into effect in 2019).

The main cost risk associated with extending parole ineligibility is the cost associated with keeping an offender in custody who would have otherwise been allowed to serve their sentence in the community on parole. The difference in cost between keeping an offender in maximum security and allowing that offender to serve their sentence in the community through full parole is $124,796 per year (in 2016 dollars). Keeping an inmate in custody in maximum security for 40 years would cost approximately $1.9 million more (in 2016 dollars) than keeping them in custody in maximum security for 25 years and supervising them on parole for 15 years.

Using the highest-cost assumptions, Bill C-266 could result in up to 9 offenders being kept in custody rather than being on parole by 2058, entailing a cost of $1.1 million per year indefinitely. The first additional offender would be kept in custody in 2044, when an offender sentenced in 2019 would reach the end of the current 25-year period of parole ineligibility. The number of additional offenders being kept in custody increases over time until it stabilizes at 9 offenders in 2058, after which the first additional offender kept in custody reaches the maximum 40-year period of parole ineligibility.

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